Technology & InternetHere's My Content, So Share Me Maybe

Content that evokes real emotion doesn't hinder professionalism; it breeds a connection, inspires trust, and induces a higher return on investment.

Abercrombie-and-fitch-models-cover-call-me-maybe_450x254

Your target group will invest in you once you have exposed them to content that resonates with their belief system. Whether this emotional response is personal (it makes them delighted, inspired, angry) or professional (they feel competitive, driven), it is essential to connect on a level that taps into their core set of values or desires and compels them to take action.

You do this by proving you have more than just a pulse. Your audience should sense your motivation and feel your passion as if you were a long lost mentor or friend. The should want to get to know you, because you have either tapped into something universal, or inspired them see things in a new light. You are their new favorite food, they didn't realize they were craving.  

Here are three companies that have jumped on board and infused their campaigns with content that moves us:

1. F-secure is a global, online software and security company based in Finland. In an effort to bring exposure to F-secure, the company's virus expert went on a mission to track down the creators of the first documented PC virus. He indeed founded the creators (brothers in Pakistan) and made a documentary-style video about the adventure.

The 'film' not only provides answers about the 20+ year old virus, it is captivating. Whether or not the topic of viruses are on your everyday radar - the composition, honesty and curiosity of the content inspire a feeling of connectedness with F-secure's story. It isn't just expert, Mikko Hypponen who's there. It's the viewer's journey as well.   

2. Abercrombie & Fitch recently revamped its corporate image after its slow and steady decline since the early 2000’s. Jumping on the ‘Call Me Maybe’ bandwagon (people covering pop singer, Carly Rae Jepsen's, catchy summer tune), Abercrombie & Fitch gathered a team of their most stunning models to shoot a music video covering the song. The video, in black and white, is the living, breathing (lip-syncing and dancing) reincarnation of the trademark, wall-size shirtless images in the store. The short clip went viral in less than 72 hours, ultimately rebranding the infamous A&F name.

Though met by a handful of critics, its rampant virality suggests Abercrombie & Fitch successfully distracted their audience from the reality that they are often considered a large and frigid corporation. The company instead translates a sense of humor, humility and social/popular awareness in just two short minutes of aesthetically engaging footage.

3. Velocity Partners Ltd. is a B2B marketing company from the UK that created the ebook B2B Marketing Manifesto. The manifesto is informative, sharp and witty, but leaves a lasting impression for the way it connects to the reader on a humanistic level.

It tells the story of how B2B marketing has evolved in a way that mimics the telling of any scientific or social evolution. The writing is jovial, but clear in stating that what used to exist in the marketing world is no longer relevant – that we must adapt to survive. Infusing the manifesto with cultural references, the reader can grasp the material from a familiar perspective, creating the opportunity to present data at a moment when the reader is engaged.

The layout of the ebook plays a similar psychological role. While colors are bold, there is enough white to avoid feeling overwhelmed. The writing, too, is so large (and sentences so clear and brief) that each new point is like a low-hanging piece of fruit.

The manifesto is indeed targeting a niche of professionals (B2B marketers), but the magic exists in the way it connects B2B marketing data and practices to concepts which are universally understood. The marketers feel, with scientific, cultural and social references that they must be part of a ‘the bigger picture.’

Brain and Heart

These three companies are exceedingly different in their emotional content marketing approach, yet the message is clear: if you want your audience to put your content into action, you have to put both relatable feeling and thought into your content. 

Author

ProfErin NelsonexploreB2B GmbHCommunication & Marketing Manager

Discussion

No one started a discussion on this article. Start the first discussion.
To start a new Discussion on this article, you have to be Register for Free on exploreB2B and on the page Logged in .

Not registered yet?

Register now for free or connect Linkedin_with_en
Tracking?type=article&id=2134&ref=